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Industrial Ethernet Book 103

Technology Next generation softwaredefi ned Wide Area Networks Software-defi ned WAN technology leverages and virtualizes multiple types of connections between business locations, as well as connections between data centers, remote offi ces, and cloud resources. SD-WAN also provides a way to leverage broadband Internet while incorporating traditional dedicated WAN technologies. Software-defi ned WAN leverages and virtualizes multiple types of connections between business locations including data centers, remote offi ces and the cloud. SOFTWARE-DEFINED WIDE AREA NETWORKS are becoming the basis for a new generation of WANs for enterprises and service providers. Just as Frame Relay and ATM migrated to MPLS for business connectivity, the combination of SD-WAN, migration to the cloud, and commodity Internet broadband are offering a compelling, affordable and fl exible option to augment the WAN. The move to SD-WAN becomes imperative as demand increases for business critical, bandwidth hungry real time applications in offi ces and fi eld locations. The traditional WAN Before diving into the new world of SD-WAN, let’s review traditional wide area networks. A WAN traditionally connects a company’s business locations together, creating what’s essentially a single large network that might span multiple locations within a city, locations in many cities, or even locations across national boundaries or around the world. Those businesses might have one or more data centers, and multiple offi ces that have remote workers. The goal is to provide seamless connectivity between remote locations and the applications they reply upon, no matter where those applications are hosted. Workers inside a business location are connected via a local area network (LAN), which is a private, high-speed network, installed, owned and maintained by the business. The LAN can be wired and wireless using technologies like Ethernet and WiFi. Likewise, servers within a data center are also tied together with high-speed LANs. The WAN ties those sites together. By contrast with the high-speed, private LAN owned by the business, WANs are services traditionally provisioned by telecommunications companies. WANs are much slower than LANs, and incur monthly charges based on bandwidth, guaranteed reliability, and the distance between the sites. WANs can take weeks or months to set up, and just as long to make service changes, such as to adding bandwidth to handle new demands. There are many telecommunications technologies used to implement traditional WANs. Older technologies include leased lines, Frame Relay, ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode). One of the most popular WAN technologies today is MPLS (Multi-Protocol Label Switching). While MPLS-based WANs run across one or more carriers’ networks using complex protocols, they can be thought of as highly reliable, very secure, point-to- point links between a business’ sites. The downside of MPLS-based WANs is that they are expensive, slow to provision, and diffi cult to change to adapt to varying requirements. Why not use the Internet for connecting business locations? The Internet is ubiquitous, inexpensive and flexible. However, the Internet is famously unreliable, both in terms of uptime and in the ability to deliver consistent throughput. It’s also insecure, and without additional security, cannot be trusted for intra-business traffi c, such as accessing key business applications, servers or fi les. The challenge is that businesses are increasingly frustrated with traditional WANs. IT professionals and executives like that WANs are reliable, predictable and secure. On the other hand, businesses don’t like the monthly expense, slow provisioning times and the lack of fl exibility. They also don’t like that WANs become more complex when the business locations are in different countries. Finally, with the emergence of cloud computing, the traditional WAN falls short architecturally to the needs of the new paradigm. The SD-WAN World Software-defined WAN leverages and virtualizes multiple types of connections between business locations, including 26 industrial ethernet book 11.2017 SOURCE: VELOCLOUD


Industrial Ethernet Book 103
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