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Industrial Ethernet Book 99

The diagram above illustrates an end-to-end use case for airport visual security with implications for cloud computing, the edge and fog. Airport visual security, called surveillance, creates complex, data-intensive demands required to achieve the needs for real-time information collection, sharing, analysis, and action. secure. Data integrity is a special aspect of security for devices that currently lack adequate security. This includes intentional and unintentional corruption. Manageability: Managing all aspects of fog deployments, which include RAS, DevOps, etc., is a critical aspect across all layers of a fog computing hierarchy. Data Analytics and Control: The ability for fog nodes to be autonomous requires localized data analytics coupled with control. The actuation/control needs to occur at the correct tier or location in the hierarchy as dictated by the given scenario. It is not always at the physical edge, but may be at a higher tier. IT Business and Cross Fog Applications: Multi-vendor ecosystem applications need the ability to migrate and properly operate at any level of a fog deployment’s hierarchy. Applications should be able to span all levels of a deployment to maximize their value. There are three identified viewpoints in the Architecture description diagram: Software, System, and Node. Software view: is represented in the top three layers shown in the architecture description, and include Application Services, Application Support, and Node Management (IB) and Software Backplane. System view: This is represented in the middle layers shown in the architecture description, which include Hardware Virtualization down through the Hardware Platform Infrastructure. Node view: is represented in the bottom two layers, which includes the Protocol Abstraction Layer and Sensors, Actuators, and Control. End-to-end deployment use case The following example describes an end-to-end use case for Airport Visual Security with outcomes for cloud, the edge and fog. Airport visual security, called surveillance, illustrates the complex, data-intensive demands required for real-time information collection, sharing, analysis, and action. First, let’s look at the passenger’s journey: - Leaves from home and drives to the airport - Parks in the long-term parking garage - Takes bags to airport security checkpoint - Bags are scanned and checked in - Checks in through security and proceeds to boarding gate - Upon arrival, retrieves bags - Proceeds to rental car agency; leaves airport This travel scenario is without incident. But when one or more threats are entered into this scenario, the visual security requirements become infinitely more complicated. For example: - The vehicle entering the airport is stolen - The passenger’s name is on a no-fly list - The passenger leaves his luggage unattended someplace in the airport - The passenger’s luggage doesn’t arrive with the flight - The luggage is scanned and loaded on the plane, but it is not picked up by the correct passenger. - An imposter steals or switches a boarding pass with another passenger and gets on someone else’s flight. - The passenger takes someone else’s luggage at the arrival terminal Catching these possible threats requires an extensive network of surveillance cameras across the outbound and inbound airports, involving several thousand cameras. Approximately one terabyte of data per camera per day must be transmitted to security personnel or forwarded to local machines for scanning and analysis. In addition, law enforcement will need data originating from multiple systems about the suspect passenger’s trip, from the point of origination to arrival. Finally, all of the video and data must be integrated with a real-time threat assessment and remediation system. Cloud and Edge Approaches. In an edge-tocloud design, every camera (edge device) in the airport transmits directly to the cloud for processing, as well as the other relevant data collected from the passenger’s travel records. While there are advantages to both approaches, the disadvantages can lead the systems susceptible to incidents. Adherence to OpenFog RA The OpenFog Consortium intends to partner with standards development organizations and provide detailed requirements to facilitate a deeper level of interoperability. This will take time, as establishing new standards is a lengthy process. Prior to finalization of these detailed standards, the Consortium is laying the groundwork for component level interoperability and certification. Testbeds will prove the validity of the OpenFog RA through adherence to the architectural principles. Next steps The OpenFog RA is the first step in creating industry standards for fog computing. It represents an industry commitment toward cooperative, open and inter-operative fog systems to accelerate advanced deployments in smart cities, smart energy, smart transportation, smart healthcare, smart manufacturing and more. Its eight pillars describe requirements to every part of the fog supply chain: component manufacturers, system vendors, software providers, application developers. Looking forward, the OpenFog Consortium will publish additional details and guidance on this architecture, specify APIs for key interfaces, and work with standards organizations such as IEEE on recommended standards. The OpenFog technical community is working on a suite of follow-on specifications, testbeds which prove the architecture, and new use cases to enable component-level interoperability. Eventually, this work will lead to certification of industry elements and systems, based on compliance to the OpenFog RA. Technology report by OpenFog Consortium, Architecture Workgroup. 26 industrial ethernet book 4.2017 SOURCE: OPENFOG CONSORTIUM


Industrial Ethernet Book 99
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