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Industrial Ethernet Book 99

THE VISTA IRRIGATION DISTRICT was founded in 1882 and grew quickly as its Mediterranean climate proved to be excellent for agricultural homesteaders. But throughout the water district’s long history, technology has played an important role in its ability to support its customers. Its mission is to provide a reliable supply of high quality water that meets the needs of its present and future customers in an economically and environmentally responsible manner. The water district transports over five billion gallons of water per year. Moving that volume of water requires more than 435 miles of pipeline, monitored and controlled at over 30 remote sites including pump stations, reservoirs, source water connection points, and flow control facilities. Sourcing, transporting, and storing that much water for 127,000 people creates a need for real-time situational awareness of the water transportation system. And during times of extreme drought, the need is even greater and every measure must be taken to properly manage this valuable resource. As the area increased in population, the Vista Irrigation District was created in 1923 to ensure a reliable source of water for the naturally arid region. At the time, local avocado and citrus farms were expanding so rapidly that residents quickly developed serious concerns for the area’s dwindling water supply. To supply local residents with water from nearby Lake Henshaw, the District constructed 14 miles of concrete flume to deliver water from the lake to the irrigation district. Later, faced with drought and the devastating impact it would have on the agricultural community, Vista Irrigation District sought additional water sources to supplement its local source from Lake Henshaw. Over 20 years ago, the District partnered with local automation manufacturer Opto 22 and system integrator IDAC West. During their first project, Vista Irrigation District and IDAC West needed a reliable remote monitoring and control solution to manage each of the remote sites. A SCADA system was chosen consisting of Opto 22 mistic I/O controllers and G4 I/O modules. Remote sites were networked together using RS-232 serial connections and leased lines from the local telephone company. G4 I/O modules were designed to last and, through over two decades of service, the system continued to run well. But eventually the District decided it was time to upgrade their current serial-based SCADA hardware platform to an Ethernet-based system. The Solution “After developing a small pilot PAC system at our well field at Lake Henshaw, it became very clear that we needed to move forward and upgrade the serial system within our potable water distribution system,” said Frank Wolinski, Operations and Field Services Manager for the Vista Irrigation District. Vista Irrigation District puts new technologies into operation using a phased approach. This approach allows the District to spread the costs of technology investments out over time and receive the greatest return 22 industrial ethernet book 4.2017 SOURCE: OPTO 22 Automation impact on Vista Irrigation District Ethernet-based programmable automation controllers have enabled the water district to take advantage of the latest networking communications protocols, such as Ethernet and TCP/IP. Controllers and I/O processors offer built-in Ethernet network interfaces, as well as optional 802.11 wireless communications as well. Applications A technology-savvy water district is utilizing automation control technology and an engineering partnership to keep Southern California’s fresh water supply flowing.


Industrial Ethernet Book 99
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