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Industrial Ethernet Book 104

Technology Manufacturing IIoT: “Green Patch” in brownfield The ‘green patch’ concept takes required capex for a new product line or process within a brownfield plant to implement IIoT functionality. The greenfield means fresh equipment, tooling and state-of-the-art OT and IT with the bandwidth, processing power and memory needed to apply advanced software and processes. THE INDUSTRIAL INTERNET OF THINGS (IIoT) takes advantage of the latest software and hardware capabilities to increase productivity. It stands to reason that greenfield manufacturing plants might be planned with native IIoT technologies. After all, today’s factory automation systems can incorporate web servers and clients, standardsbased communications, and substantial processing power and memory. But the majority of manufacturers face a mandate to increase the operational efficiency of their existing brownfield assets. In a greenfield, there is no need to integrate with legacy systems. In a brownfield, integration can be a major challenge with assets that may be decades old. The machine control systems typically are not networked and do not communicate with each other. Once IIoT sensors, networks and edge devices are overlaid the existing assets and analytics applied – the legacy control systems may not have the capabilities to optimize operations. Conversely, retrofitting the existing controls has not been widely practiced. Rewriting machine control code is an investment that carries a significant potential risk, and the machinery’s electrical and mechanical components may also not be capable of executing on the new control capability. Here’s how can manufacturers go from brownfields to greener pastures, by revisiting a 1970’s retro-concept known as the focused factory, or factory within a factory. You essentially make a smaller, yet still greenfield, IIoT investment inside your existing facility. You can call it a pilot, but actually, it is a full-scale manufacturing system, line or cell(s) fully intended to continue in profitable production indefinitely. Call it a ‘green patch’ in the brownfield. With a well-defined scope, it becomes a manageable, measurable proofof concept project that pays for itself before scaling up. Availability x Performance x Quality = OEE Green patch project A greenfield means fresh equipment, tooling and state-of-the-art Operational Technologies (OT) and Information Technologies (IT) with the bandwidth, processing power and memory needed to apply advanced software and processes. This definition also applies to a green patch, only on a more limited scale. These capabilities support predictive maintenance, supply chain visibility, energy management, rapid changeovers, product lifecycle management and more. Consider the following criteria for a green patch project: • A new product line or process that requires capital expenditure (capex) investment, a built-in cost justification. • High value, complex products where IIoT can make a dollar impact on yield. • An application that will benefit from flexibility – high variability/low volume, batch-of- one manufacturing, short lead times, anticipated product modifications and options. • An operation where maximum uptime is essential, that will benefit from predictive maintenance. • Manageable scope: a production line or cell that can effectively be selfcontained and operate independently from the rest of the factory. • An operation that can be isolated – with SOURCE: EI3 CORPORATION MES/ERP that may be self-contained and may be hosted on premise, both to eliminate IT security issues and develop a flattened IIoT network hierarchy. Constraints of green patch project Constraints are the same as for any other upgrade in a brownfield environment. The green patch must conform to the physical footprint, shared resources and other constraints of the existing facility. These can include utilities, physical obstructions such as columns and roof height, air filtration and even the available labor pool and zoning restrictions. Each issue and solution will need to be evaluated on the basis of potential payback, and can help define project scope. For example, does a clean room need to be built to mitigate airborne contamination from adjacent processes, or is it better to construct a new building if the land is available? Or can critical equipment be purchased in an isolator configuration, and if so, what impact will this have on the efficiency of ongoing operations, maintenance and replenishment? Origin of ‘focused factory’ The concept of the “focused factory” was introduced by Dr. Wickham Skinner in the mid- 1970s while serving as faculty at Harvard Business School and it shares some traits with our green patch. The decade had brought 31 2.2018 industrial ethernet book


Industrial Ethernet Book 104
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